Journey to Jerusalem: A roadmap

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This is the last week of our summer season. On Wednesday, the new season of Lent begins. We will kick off with an austere service which calls us to humble repentance. We will name how we have fallen into disobedience, disillusionment, despair, darkness, even hell; we will seek God’s forgiveness; and we will commit ourselves to the Lenten journey to Jerusalem. Continue reading “Journey to Jerusalem: A roadmap”

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The wilderness beckons

Next week we will hold a service on Ash Wednesday, 6 March, at 6pm. During the service, we remember that we are formed from dust and will return to dust; and we recall the tradition of repentance in dust and ashes. It is an austere ritual which includes being marked by the sign of the cross in ashes; and is the first step on the road to Jerusalem. That is, it is the first day of Lent: the forty days leading up to Easter, and a time when Christians reflect deeply on Jesus’ life and ministry and their own call to discipleship. Continue reading “The wilderness beckons”

Lions and Tigers and Bears, oh my!

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Once upon a time, my fiancé and I were living in North Fitzroy; and we were married by Paul Turton at the North Carlton Baptist Church. We stood before the congregation, and made our promises, and were declared a wedded couple. Straightaway, I met a surprising number of interesting, intelligent, and attractive men. I began wondering if my own interesting, intelligent, and attractive man was really the best option, or whether I had made a colossal mistake; and I found myself wrestling with demons of pride, and doubt, and desire.  Continue reading “Lions and Tigers and Bears, oh my!”

Prepare the Way: But How?

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Once upon a time, long, long ago, I lived in Washington, DC. We went to a church which was once Harry Truman’s, then Jimmy Carter’s; and the Clintons came a couple times. Its members included diplomats, military men, and CIA staff; investors, bankers, and millionaires; presidential advisors, scientists, and journalists; and a governor of the Federal Reserve. So one of the hardest things about moving to Warrnambool is the teeny-tiny feeling that I have dropped off the face of the earth. It’s not a hamlet; but compared to living in our capital city, let alone the city I once lived in, Warrnambool feels remote indeed. It’s not that the powerful had any time for me; it’s just that I’m used to thinking that power is all around me. And at some deep level, I assume—wrongly—that big and powerful human places is where the real stuff happens: the God-stuff.  Continue reading “Prepare the Way: But How?”

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